No one’s impressed at your decision to not photoshop already-perfect models

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No one’s impressed at your decision to not photoshop already-perfect models

Let’s ask for more out of ‘advocates’

In the age of body positivity, being a body confidence advocate is cool. Magazines, brands, and celebrities have taken a stand against photoshop to prove their body-posi stance. And while the collective stand against completely unrealistic photographs is obviously a step in the right direction, we shouldn’t just take anti-photoshop advocacy on its face.

Many brands are boasting that they represent real women by not photoshopping their ads. But there’s nothing really monumental about allowing naturally beautiful women to be naturally beautiful. And most of the brands who champion their anti-photoshop stance are still using models that aren’t representative of the general population.

Avoiding photoshop when your models don’t have any rolls, stretch marks, or other “flaws” in the first place isn’t the resolution for how women’s bodies are criticized in society. True, well-executed representation needs to be recognized as more important.

I want to see more than a model with abs who happens to have a microscopic scar on her abdomen. I want to see more than a woman’s smile lines not being blended out. I want to see women who have traditionally been told they aren’t beautiful.

I want to see fat women. I want to see women with stretch marks on their tummy, not just on their ass. I want to see women who have skin disorders. I want to see trans women. I want to see women of color with kinky hair. And I want to see them all completely unaltered.

Obviously, all women are real women. And representing real women must sometimes involve the thin and typically ‘beautiful.’ But we should ask for more out of these ‘advocates’ than ads with five not photoshopped women who all look the same. Society already tells certain girls they are beautiful – let’s advocate for others.

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